Crusty Bread with Tiger/Dutch Crust topping

Crusty Bread with Tiger/Dutch Crust topping

Tiger/Dutch Crust Bread

There are various breads that will benefit from this topping.

It is known by various names, Tiger bread, Dutch Crust…..

So for this ‘single knead’ bread, the ingredients and instructions are listed below.

Enjoy experimenting with your breads.

This bread can be prepared by hand or machine.

Crusty Bread

  • 450g Strong White Bread Flour (Type 65 in France)
  • 8g Traditional dried yeast
  • 150ml warm whole milk
  • 175ml warm water
  • 20g salted butter
  • 10g salt

Dutch Crust

  • 25g rice flour
  • 1g active dry yeast
  • 1g salt
  • 1g sugar
  • 1 tsp vegetable oil
  • 25 ml of warm water

To prepare the yeast, pour the milk from the fridge into a jug, then I added recently boiled water from the kettle, and then added the butter. I allowed the butter to start to melt in the jug and gave it all a quick mix. Add the sachet of yeast to the jug and leave for the yeast to get bubbly.

(I normally use instant dried yeast, but thought I would try this today to see the difference).

In France they have various dry yeasts, instant and not so instant, but the biggest issue is the weight in the sachets, they range from 5 to 8g and all fractions in between. Of course they also sell fresh yeast, if you wish to use fresh yeast, multiply the amount of dry yeast by 3 and you are good to go.

Once your yeast has been activated (bubbly) in the jug, add the flour and salt to a large mixing bowl and give it a quick mix to distribute the salt in the flour.

Start adding the liquid to the flour, I start with 2/3rd just to bring everything together and then gradually add the remainder, give the liquid mixture a quick mix each time, just to make sure you don’t have any yeast lying on the bottom of the jug.

If you have a food mixer with a dough hook it does make things a lot easier, but if not, you can still make this bread, it will just take a bit more elbow power.

Keep kneading the dough until it all  comes together, it should be a little bit sticky, this will allow for a good rise. Don’t be tempted to add lots of flour, as this will be incorporated into your dough and you can end up with a very dense bread.

To test if you have kneaded the dough enough, the the dough into a ball, turn the dough over so you have a nice smooth top, tuck the sides down and under the ball, this is what is called the ‘gluten cloak’ and with a floured finger, prod/poke the bread and see if it bounces all the way back, if it does, your work here is done, if not, then turn it over and knead for another couple of minutes and test again.

Now you have a decision to make !!!!

What style of bread do I want to bake, Boule, tin, baguette……. decisions decisions

Today we are making a tin loaf.….. Find the correct tin, take a piece of grease proof paper and lightly oil it, place the dough in the center of the grease proof paper and place it into the tin. Make sure you get the paper into the corners of the bread tin, or it will bake into your bread.

You need to cover your dough, damp tea towel, oiled cling film. OR a nice tick that I have picked up (not sure from where) a disposable shower cap, its great it has the elastic around the edge and makes sure the plastic creates a cover for the dough.

Now your work is done (well other than waiting and putting the dough into the oven), place the covered dough in a warm, draft free place, this can be near the cooker (if you are cooking something else), in front of a window that the sun is shining in…..

If you are using the dutch crust topping, place all the dry ingredients into a small bowl, add the oil and mix together, then add most of the water and mix together, you are looking for a thick paste texture, you may need a little more water, then place some cling film over your bowl and leave in a warm place along with the bread, it will be ready when your bread is fully proved.

If you really don’t have a warm place, before you start making your dough, put your oven on to 200C/400F/Gas 6 for 10 minutes and when your dough is ready to prove, turn off the oven and put your dough in the oven and the residual heat will help with the proving process.

The dough is ready for the oven when it is doubled in size, this can be 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on where you have left it to prove. If you are short of time and make the dough before you go off to do something else, that’s great, but just leave the dough in a cool place so it doesn’t ‘over prove’.

Ok, so over proving, this is when the yeast has worked hard and you typically have a very ‘wobbly’ dough and the bubbles burst easily. If this happens, then the best solution is to take it out of the tin and re-knead the dough, and then allowing it to prove again.

When your dough has proved heat the oven to 240C/475F/Gas 9, if you are using the dutch crust, then paint it on now and leave the bread for 10 mins to recover (you can knock it back a bit with the topping) and then place it in the oven. After 10 minutes in the very hot oven, turn the temperature down to 200C/400F/Gas 6 and continue cooking for 25 minutes.

To check if your bread is ready, first check if it has a nice golden (even dark brown)  top, if so, then remove from the oven and tap the top, if it sounds hollow it is done. If not (either checks) then leave in the oven for another 5 minutes and check again.

Other styles for your dough…..

The boule, pour some oil into a bowl and put the dough into the bowl upside down, roll it around and then flip over so you have the top of the dough showing and that there is oil all over the dough.

Cover the bowl with a lid, cling film or a disposable show cap. Place in a warm place for about 30-45 minutes or until it has doubled in size.

Prepare a baking tray, place a piece of grease proof paper on the tray, and gently slide the dough out of the bowl onto the tray, use the oil in the bowl to help the dough slide out, you want to keep the top of the dough as the top.

Paint the topping onto the dough and place it in the oven.

Baguette style : Once you have kneaded the dough and you have tested to see if it is ready to prove, take a piece of grease proof paper and oil it slightly, lay on a baking tray. (If you have a baguette tray it is ideal for this)

Take your dough and cut into 2 equal pieces, take each piece and roll into a sausage shape, tucking the cut side into the centre of the dough so you have a smooth exterior.

Place the dough onto the tray and oil the dough and cover with oiled cling film and allow to rise.  Place in a warm place until the dough has doubled in size

When it is ready to bake, top with the topping and place in the oven.

Rolls : Once you have kneaded the dough and you have tested to see if it is ready to prove, take a piece of grease proof paper and oil it slightly, lay on a baking tray.

Take your dough and cut into 6 equal pieces, take each piece and roll into ball, tucking the top around as for the boule. Place the dough onto the tray and oil the dough and cover with oiled cling film and allow to rise.

(If you want the rolls to be crusty all around, place then about 10 cm apart on the tray so there is plenty of space for them to rise, if you want them to have soft edges, place them close together on the tray and the will rise into each other and create that soft edge).

Place in a warm place until the dough has doubled in size

When it is ready to bake, top with the topping and place in the oven.

 

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